Tuesday, April 10, 2007

Enough with the sailors

…Although, hmm…six figures for the story of a 15-day detention in Iran? Help! I’ve been held hostage for almost four years. Is there an agent out there willing to save me?

10 comments:

CA reader said...

Actually.....your story in a book format (or essay collection) could be quite a seller. Ane aything to counter the Sally Field/Alfred Molina "American woman in Iran" story is a welcome contribution!
-CA Reader

Anonymous said...

READING LOLITA IN TEHRAN I think gives a pretty good idea about what life is like for well educated folks living in a theoracy. Am I wrong?

Kamangir said...

How much money are you looking for?

VinceP1974 said...

If only the current King of Persian had as much sexual tension when making threats as the one in 300 it would be more interesting to watch.

VinceP1974 said...

Here's some possible consequences of the humiliation that the UK allowed itself to suffer:

http://eureferendum.blogspot.com/2007/04/coincidence.html

Coincidence?


After the bomb attack in Basra last week, in which four British service personnel and their translator were murdered while travelling in their Warrior infantry combat vehicle, another major incident in Basra has been reported – mercifully with no loss of life amongst coalition forces.

This was a street battle in Basra's southwestern Qibla district yesterday where, according to Reuters, British troops were engaged in a major gun battle after coming under fire during a routine search operation.

Army spokesman Lieutenant-Colonel Kevin Stratford-Wright confirmed the action, saying that "ten of the enemy were hit", although he did not know whether they had been wounded or killed. "There was a substantial exchange of gunfire," he added.

According to his account, gunmen had opened fire on the British force from alleyways and rooftops with machinegun fire and several rocket-propelled grenades. The soldiers returned fire from machineguns mounted on armoured personnel carriers.

There have been very few such reports of fighting on this scale – where the fighting has been initiated by the insurgents - and, although there have been concerns about the growing intensity of attacks on British forces, this appears to be a significant escalation.

Coming so soon after the release of the fifteen naval hostages from Iran, in a display of weakness that has repeatedly been aired on Arab television throughout the region, one can only ask if the hostage-taking is in some way linked to what appears to be the growing confidence of the largely Iranian-backed insurgents.

It is perhaps too early to tell and, with the paucity of western journalists in the city, the flow of news may not be sufficiently reliable to judge from future reports.

However, no one can say that the compliant behaviour of the navy hostages in Iranian hands and the ease with which they were captured has actually enhanced Britain's reputation abroad. Therefore, the possibility that the yesterday's attack on British troops is related cannot be dismissed.

The MoD will, of course, deny any linkage but it will be tragic if it is the Army which pays the price for the Navy's carelessness.

ET said...

Thanks ca reader...I am, in fact, writing a book. I'll keep you all posted.

Kamangir, I would say that $10,000 a day for every day of my captivity sounds about right ;-)

Anon, I have not yet read all of Reading Lolita... shame on me...

And VinceP, for once I agree... if only the ir prez were as sexy as Xerxes in 300...

christopher said...

et,
i've been about 75% the way thru "reading lolita. ." since january. if i ever ever finish it, perhaps i'll post some brief commentary and you can help either confirm or refute some of the impressions cast.

CA reader said...

I just finished reading "Reading Lolita in Tehran" and while I thoroughly enjoyed it, it obviously paints a one-sided picture of Iran (I almost fell off my chair when I saw she thanks Bernard Lewis in the epilogue!). So, I decided to do a bit of extra research on Nafisi and Reading Lolita… and found the following to be an interesting read: http://weekly.ahram.org.eg/2006/797/special.htm

Also, I hope to check a book that I just found online that is a bit of a rebuttal to Nafisi’s work, "Jasmine and Stars: Reading more than Lolita in Tehran" (Fatemeh Keshavarz), when it comes out in paperback.

I would be very interested in hearing the thoughts of others (ET?) who have read Nafisi’s book … especially readers currently in Iran!

-CA reader

ca reader said...

"...I am, in fact, writing a book. I'll keep you all posted."

I just saw this -- yes, please do keep us posted and good luck!

-CA reader

Lotf Ali said...

"Reading Lolita" is no longer a true picture of life in Iran. Things change. Read another book.

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