Friday, June 19, 2009

Friday Sermon Gives Permission for Bloodbath

Those saying that Khamenei's sermon today was a conciliatory one and a call for calm are living in a dream world. The fact that Ayatollah Khamanei called the millions of people who came to the streets in the past few days are "agents of the West" and calling the election fair and historic is shocking and divisive, but expected.

His unwavering support for Ahmadinejad and the unwillingness to investigate the vote has made it impossible for any compromise to be reached.

This speech was absolutely meant to terrify the Iranian people off the streets and back into their homes. He has now stated that any protest is illegal and that any violence will be the responsibility of the opposition.

His calls for using legal system for protesting the election results are meaningless when those laws have already been circumvented to declare AN the winner. Saying that Iran is a great democracy is also meaningless when any protest is illegal and lethal force is used to crackdown on demonstrators.

31 comments:

Anonymous said...

کودتاگران درایران عزم خودرا جزم کرده اند که بابراه انداختن حمام خون در ایران خلافت اسلامی راجایگزین جمهوری اسلامی نمایند.سخنان امروز علی خامنه ای که نقش رهبری این کودتای ننگین را به عهده داردبهترین شاهد این مدعا است.اینجانب برحسب وظیفهءانسانی خود به رییس جمهوری آمریکااقای اوباماوروءسای جمهوری کشورهای اروپایی هشدار می دهم که هرگونه مسامحه وکوتاهی آنان در برابرکودتاچیان صلاحیت آنان رادربرابرملت هایشان زیرسوءال خواهدبرد.وظیفهءانسانی آنان حکم می کندقبل از آنکه دیرشود اقدام نمایندوازاین حمام خون جلوگیری کنند.بدیهی است دخالت آنان دراین موردمیتواندمانعی تعیین کننده درمقابل این کشتارباشد.

John said...

Learning Persian can take a long time. But, thanks to Google Translate you can now convert Persian into English (badly, I'll admit).

Want to follow what's being said in Persian on Twitter? Easy! Follow these steps...

http://isthistaarof.blogspot.com/2009/06/translate-persian-twitter-messages-with.html

Keith said...

This from the Ayatollah: “Street challenge is not acceptable,” Ayatollah Khamenei said. “This is challenging democracy after the elections.” He said opposition leaders would be “held responsible for chaos” if they did not end the protests.

That man needs get out from behind his robes. He has no clue what democracy is even though he's watching it in action as the protests continue peacefully. I hope the free people of Iran do not back down to this diatribe.

Hold strong to the truth which you have been doing this past week. Unlike what Ayatollah says - it's not coming from the West. He's shaking in his boots because he knows the truth - and his using the West to incite destruction is his last attempt to hold power.

Fr. Antony said...

So many of us were watching, hoping and praying for reason to prevail, but perhaps we were naive. Those in power are often so addicted to it that they cannot see past their own noses. My prayers are with our freedom-loving Iranian sisters and brothers now more than ever. I fear there will be many more martyrs before the dictator, whose face we see more clearly, is defeated. God be with you all.

Aina said...

I'm mad as hell and very disappointed. What was the reason for having an election and protesting when nothing about this regime is democratic? Is there any way out of this without a bloodbath? We had revolution in 1979 and 8 years of war with Iraq. I don't want any more blood but I am not hopeful that we can get out of this mess peacefully.

ella said...

Keith

You ask US to hold to doing nothing? To not protest treatment of Iranians by their government?
You are saying that Khamenei using the west to incite destruction is Khamenei last gasp?
Are you for real?
Khamenei is saying that west is inciting Iranians. Up to now West was doing nothing because West and America were afraid that if they would support protesters they would be accused exactly of the thing Khamenei is accusing them now.
So what is the difference between being accused of doing something and doing the same thing?
You are fake, keith.

Matt said...

There's gonna be a lot of blood, but I hope the Iranians don't back down. It's now or never! Go get'em boys!!! IRAN AZAD!!!!!

Anonymous said...

Time to break out the Ayatollah Assahola tshirts again.

Keith said...

Ella
I might be misunderstood - I hope I can clarify. I don't fully understand what your contention is with me. I definitely am not fake. The first part of my comment was taken from the Ayatollah's speech (quoted from The Lede blog at NY Times).

In his speech the Ayatollah talks about democracy and the need for the protests to end. I laugh when he calls this democracy. Who was involved in the vote tabulation? All parties? Was it transparent? Yes - I agree with him that any course of action to dispute the results should go through the proper legal channels. Are Iranians confident that this is a viable route? From what I see and read - that's questionable. What is there to fear from an honest count of the election returns?

He also blames the west for inciting such protests that can damage the goals/aspirations of the Iranian Republic. I HAVE SAID NOWHERE IN MY COMMENTS ANYTHING about what role outside governments should be playing - neither my government - the USA - Britain or any country. I speak only for myself. If you think I am a fake - I can't change your opinion which you are entitled to.

This morning when I read the title of this blog - I was saddened and shocked. It's a viewpoint held by the authors of this blog Kamran and Tori. I am inspired by the peaceful protests - and can understand the protesters questioning of the election results - and their need to take to the streets.

I might be getting this wrong - correct me if you wish: The children of the children of the 1979 Revolution have grown up in a world that is constantly changing. I am not a sociologist or a historian but I believe they are asking for reforms unlike the 1979 Revolution. This could be perceived as a threat to those who don't want change. That happened here in the west in the last 60 years. It's a generational reality.

I appreciate your feedback - I hope we can understand one another better.

Iran Junkie said...

I agree with the post. It's a prelude to a bloodbath.
http://newiranianrevolution.blogspot.com/2009/06/khameneis-speech-prelude-to-bloodbath.html

Maria Abonnel said...

Admiring, praying for Iranian protestors.
Battle lines have been clearly drawn by Ayatollah. Does he have credibility with the Iranian people, that he knows for certain what the vote count is, or do people see through this?

Now what?
So impressed by what I've seen in streets of Iran, know that people all over the world truly are paying attention to you standing up for your rights to be heard and counted.

Sen_Yamamoto said...

Rally for support of the Iranians's fight for freedom Sat 20, noon to 4, wear green

At the gazebo in the town square near the slave blocks right in front of the bridge of lions

Tori said...

"Permission" does not necessarily guarantee a bloodbath. Maybe we all have "the optimism disease" when we hope and pray that demonstrations can and will proceed peacefully.

And I agree with Keith: this is so not a western movement. This is a homegrown movement.

Ella, It's better to be realistic: the US will not attack Iran. It won't send in the national guard. The Iraqis who rose up against Saddam after Bush Sr's promise of support discovered this the hard way. The US did not go to Burma either when people took to the streets. Best to know the ground rules going in.

Marie said...

I remember when I lived in Iran, in 1979 and 1980, people would ask me, "Why doesn't your country send the Marines in?" Our hands are tied, and anything we do will invalidate efforts there. Iranians have to do it on their own, or it will be illegitimate. My heart is in my mouth, waiting... To see these young faces, to hear the chants. "Down with the violence, down with corruption". It's deja vu all over again.

Keith said...

"I am prepared For martyrdom, go on strike if I am arrested" - Mir Hossein Moussavi (20 June 2009)

It's difficult to read and watch what is happening at the moment. I can't imagine the energy and anxiety flowing through the streets. To show up against militarily armed forces with only your belief that what you are doing is the right thing - amazing. Then to watch your friends being shot point blank in the head and all you can do is run.
Unconfirmed reports that the Army has refused to act for Khamenei, some generals pledged loyalty to Rafsanjani.
A sad day when a state kills its own children. Children born during the state's revolution - the children rising and only demanding honesty and change worthy of a human being. Some report this is the end of the Islamic Republic of Iran. How much blood needs to flow in the streets? For how many years?

MormonWidower said...

The son of Iran's late Shah said Monday he saw echoes of the 1979 Islamic Revolution that overthrew his father as massive crowds took to the streets against the disputed re-election of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.

"I think the climate that we see in Iran today is not dissimilar to a few months of the regime back then," former crown prince Reza Cyrus Pahlavi, who lives in exile in suburban Washington, told CNN.

The Shah has stated he is returning to the nation in this time of need. London news wires are reporting that "Reza Shah Pahlavi II" issued the following message to Iranians this morning from an unknown location:"I have returned. By the grace of Alah our Constitutionalist forces will soon stand again on Persian soil -- soil consecrated in the blood of our people. We have begun to return, dedicated and committed, to the task of destroying every vestige of theocratic control over your daily lives, and of restoring a foundation of indestructible strength ensuring the liberties of my people.

My countrymen, the seat of your government is now therefore firmly re- established on Iranian soil.

The hour of your redemption is here. Your patriots have demonstrated an unswerving and resolute devotion to the principles of freedom that challenges the best that is written on the pages of human history. I now call upon your supreme effort that the internal enemy may know from the temper of an aroused and outraged people within that ours is a a force there to contend with no less violent than is the force committed by themselves.

Rally to me. Let the indomitable spirit of our people and self-determination lead on. As the lines of battle roll forward to bring you within the zone of operations, rise and strike. Strike at every favorable opportunity. For your homes and children, strike! For future generations of your sons and daughters, strike! In the name of our sacred dead, strike! Let no heart be faint. Let every arm be steeled. The guidance of divine Alah points the way. Follow in His Name to our righteous victory!"

Unidentified sources have reported the "Shah of Iran" will return in a few days and speculation as to the exact time and exact place within Iran will only delay the inevitable.

Reza Pahlavi appealed to Western leaders, particularly President Barack Obama, to "show solidarity" with Iranians, likening their plight to that of Eastern Europeans during the Soviet era.

"I think any other signal other than this will be a slap in the face of the nation," Reza Shah Pahlavi II said.

The Shah appealed for a strong position by President Barack Obama, who has called for reconciliation with Iran after three decades of hostility.

"I would like to take this opportunity and tell the president this is a crucial moment -- on behalf of my compatriots and millions who have been turning to the outside world, particularly to this president -- to say, don't let us down."

Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, was deposed and fled Iran in January 1979 as more than a year of protests had spiraled into a paralyzing nationwide movement.

The former Shah, who died in Cairo a year later, had been a close ally of the United States. His domestic agenda included improving the role of women and weakening the power of the clergy.

His son -- who has previously stated he is not insisting on the restoration of the monarchy -- said he now wants to help the protesters.

"I would love to help them reach complete, real freedom under a secular democratic system where there's a true separation of religion from government. I will return soon," he said this morning according to his moving statement.

Iran's election authorities have again declared hardline incumbent Ahmadinejad the victor just hours after polls closed ten days ago, infuriating supporters of moderate former premier Mir Hossein Mousavi.

MormonWidower said...

The son of Iran's late Shah said Monday he saw echoes of the 1979 Islamic Revolution that overthrew his father as massive crowds took to the streets against the disputed re-election of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.

"I think the climate that we see in Iran today is not dissimilar to a few months of the regime back then," former crown prince Reza Cyrus Pahlavi, who lives in exile in suburban Washington, told CNN.

The Shah has stated he is returning to the nation in this time of need. London news wires are reporting that "Reza Shah Pahlavi II" issued the following message to Iranians this morning from an unknown location:"I have returned. By the grace of Alah our Constitutionalist forces will soon stand again on Persian soil -- soil consecrated in the blood of our people. We have begun to return, dedicated and committed, to the task of destroying every vestige of theocratic control over your daily lives, and of restoring a foundation of indestructible strength ensuring the liberties of my people.

My countrymen, the seat of your government is now therefore firmly re- established on Iranian soil.

The hour of your redemption is here. Your patriots have demonstrated an unswerving and resolute devotion to the principles of freedom that challenges the best that is written on the pages of human history. I now call upon your supreme effort that the internal enemy may know from the temper of an aroused and outraged people within that ours is a a force there to contend with no less violent than is the force committed by themselves.

Rally to me. Let the indomitable spirit of our people and self-determination lead on. As the lines of battle roll forward to bring you within the zone of operations, rise and strike. Strike at every favorable opportunity. For your homes and children, strike! For future generations of your sons and daughters, strike! In the name of our sacred dead, strike! Let no heart be faint. Let every arm be steeled. The guidance of divine Alah points the way. Follow in His Name to our righteous victory!"

Unidentified sources have reported the "Shah of Iran" will return in a few days and speculation as to the exact time and exact place within Iran will only delay the inevitable.

Reza Pahlavi appealed to Western leaders, particularly President Barack Obama, to "show solidarity" with Iranians, likening their plight to that of Eastern Europeans during the Soviet era.

"I think any other signal other than this will be a slap in the face of the nation," Reza Shah Pahlavi II said.

The Shah appealed for a strong position by President Barack Obama, who has called for reconciliation with Iran after three decades of hostility.

"I would like to take this opportunity and tell the president this is a crucial moment -- on behalf of my compatriots and millions who have been turning to the outside world, particularly to this president -- to say, don't let us down."

Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, was deposed and fled Iran in January 1979 as more than a year of protests had spiraled into a paralyzing nationwide movement.

The former Shah, who died in Cairo a year later, had been a close ally of the United States. His domestic agenda included improving the role of women and weakening the power of the clergy.

His son -- who has previously stated he is not insisting on the restoration of the monarchy -- said he now wants to help the protesters.

"I would love to help them reach complete, real freedom under a secular democratic system where there's a true separation of religion from government. I will return soon," he said this morning according to his moving statement.

Iran's election authorities have again declared hardline incumbent Ahmadinejad the victor just hours after polls closed ten days ago, infuriating supporters of moderate former premier Mir Hossein Mousavi.

ella said...

Tori

People in Iran knew that they had restrictions, a red lines which could not be crossed so they knew that when Iranian journalists were reporting from Iran they did not tell of some things. They also knew that the western journalists kept to red lines because they did not want to loose their jobs, or their ability to report from Iran. But nobody told that to western audience who are brought up in democracy and tend to believe worst of their own governments but best of other, particulalry non-western governments. That's why many students in US and elsewhere believed their lecturers who told them that Iran is not that bad. When ahmadinejad come to US many people and many students cheered Ahmadinejad at universities in California or elsewhere.

"In the eyes of many Iranian critics and supporters alike, Ahmadinejad looked like the victim. He complained about Bollinger’s “insults” and “unfriendly treatment” but kept a measured tone throughout the discussion."

They also believed a BBC persian service leading reporter who last year defended Ahmadinejad and told everybody that he is what Iranian people want. See what I mean?

I was never saying that US should attack Iran, I do not want US to attack Iran, but I would have liked Obama to take firm stand against Khamenei/Ahamdinejad from the beginning. To demand a return of fully workable Internet and cell phones, and less censorship. To protest the restrictions on Iranians, restriction on the works of journalists and writers inside Iran
Is it too much to wish for?
Is it what you think unrealistic?

And yes, it is not about Obama, US, North America or Europe. It is not about Hizbullah, Syria, Egypt, Russia or Venezuela.
It is about Iran.
But in globalised world you are never alone and the words of support can help, even from a government of a country called USA.

Anonymous said...

The world is now seeing first hand just how pernicious the Iranian regime really is. They are a disgrace to the rule of law, human rights and fundamental respect and decency. Bush may be a complete rube but he was right about one thing. The people who run that country really are evil. How else do you explain blatant fraud and then a willingness to beat up old women in the street. And then they have the gaul to hold press briefings trying to defend themselves. What a joke.

Keith said...

I've been too busy reading blogs from Iranians this week that I was not aware that the "Shah" in exile had spoken recently about the plight of the opposition movement on the streets. His concern for the citizens in Iran are noted but he does sound a bit like an opportunistic politician. Although he responded to the question if he aspired to return to Iran as shah and restore the monarchy, Pahlavi said it would be premature to answer.

"The only thing that I'm concerned with - which is my agenda, my political agenda - is to end up with a secular parliamentary, democratic system," Pahlavi said.

Such a system could take the form of a parliamentary monarchy such as in Sweden or Japan, he said. "I'm not fighting for any job right now. This is not about me," Pahlavi added.

He has that right. It may never be about him ever again. He's been living in a Republic that has no monarchy. He should take note of this model. Iran has lived under both extremist monarchy and theocracy. Neither seems to be the model for this "ancient" civilization. I hope whatever happens in the coming years - it will be the voice of tolerance, equality and reason that prevails and not just another fox wrapped in sheepskin that climbs the pulpit.

Tori said...

Ella, Yes. I have heard more people in the West defend Ahmadinejad than I ever heard when I was in Iran, including expat Iranians who now seem nearly 100% unified for change. I know that AN has his supporters inside Iran, but it is unbelievable that those supporters represent a vast majority of the voters. But there are also students in the West who have seen right through him and have never supported or cheered him.

And MormonWidower, I cannot imagine people in Iran rallying around the Shah's son. Their fight is for democracy right now.

Ella, I wish for the same things you do. I feel like there are 3 schools of thought about Iran. 1. If we just shut up, everything will work itself out. 2. Make noise. Publicize everything. 3. Don't even bother. The only thing they understand is force.

I am in school 2. Over and over again we have seen how quiet works on an individual level: people arrested, quiet from their families and the world, death, maltreatment, and torture in prison.

While the noisy campaigns have led to release and better conditions in prison. So why wouldn't this work on a national level? DISCUSS AMONG YOURSELVES.

But I also saw how the threats of the Bush admin backfired. That admin went too far too fast w/o every meaning to back up the threats with action other than econ sanctions. Now that the whole world is in an economic crisis, those sanctions are meaningless. The regime, with all of its economic mishandling, is absolved of responsibility for the dismal situation in Iran because the whole wrld is suffering.

Now I have gone on too long.

Diana said...

Look guys, I really want to like you and be on your side, but the fact is, I am suspicious.

For 30 years I have been told that the Iranian people are better than their horrible government. They have a sophisticated ancient culture, they are really not awfully religious, etc.

Well all I have to say is: they sure got a funny way of showing it.

OK, the election was stolen. So the intellect of the more intelligent Iranians was insulted. I get it.

But all this time some horrible things have gone on. Before Ahmadinejad. Remember the bombing of the Jewish Center in Buenos Aires? The bombing of the Israeli embassy in Buenos Aires before that? Dozens and dozens of people killed. Most likely this was done on the orders of Rafsanjani, one of the "good" guys here.

Not to mention the years of vicious provocation coming from Ahmadinejad. Too many to recount here, but do you remember the anti-Semitic Holocaust denying CARTOON CONTEST?

I have questions. A regime that would lie about election returns - would it lie about its nuclear ambitions? From my persective, what does it matter who is President, since he doesn't set that policy?

I have more questions.

A regime that would like to its people, shoot 'em down like dogs in the street - what would it do to Israel if given half a chance?

Another question: I know what these demonstrators are against. What are they FOR??

I have a last question.

What's in this for me?

ella said...

Tori

I've just seen an an opinion of a polish guy about Obama. From time to time he publishes stuff in polish radio and newspapers(he is very knowledgeable about Iran) . I agree with him.
There is much more in this article about what is happening now in Iran and about present US policy of doing nothing, doing even less then Europeans, then Germans, but I thought I will translate a small fragment for you.

"Regarding USA, the cynicism of Obama's administration is for me horrifying. Obama talked so much about change, hope and so on. Not long time ago he made a trip round Middle East, a region neighboring Iran. But when the revolution started in Iran Obama did not react, allegedly so that Iran regime would not accuse USA of supporting demonstrations and in that way harm protesters.

When I listened yesterday to senator Lugar I finally understood motivation of Obama's administration. Obama decided to solve the problem of Iranian nuclear arms by way of talks with Iranian regime. But people of Iran have played such an unpleasant joke on him. And that joke prevented him to get closer to and establish diplomatic contact with an Iranian regime.
Obama could get a Nobel peace prize for that. Together with Ahmadinejad.
Obama waited for couple of days and then he found out that Iranians do not surrender so quickly. Ah what a unpleasant surprise!. But anyway Lugar with disarming honesty of cynical Real Politic stated that human rights are, of course, important but nuclear program is more important. So regardless of what will happen they may establish dialog with Ahmadinejad."

Marie said...

Iranians are a heterogeneous lot - you cannot put them in a box. You want to know what the demonstrators are for? They are for greater freedom. They want their votes to count.

urban vegan said...

My thoughts are with the Iranian people. I admire your courage and persistence.

ella said...

Diana

It depends on your perspective.

If you are American then you may go with US government, say it is nothing to do with you and probable freeze on development of nuclear weapons and announce that the government invitation for July 4th garden party for employees of IRI embassy still stands.

If you are Israeli you may say that you really do not believe that change of government may bring about the stoppage of money and munition to Hamas and Hizbullah

If you are European you may say that Iranian oil is as good as Russian oil and you really prefer to be in thrall to Russian gas.

But if you a human you may say, hell with everything, they want to have better government, want their decisions to mean something. They are being killed right now. They are as human as I am. Perhaps if I support them I may regret it later, or perhaps I will benefit monetarily or otherwise from that support but for now -regardless - I am with them.

Peter said...

I am an American. My heart is with the courageous people who are speaking up for themselves and each other. You are not alone on the streets....we think of you often. Good luck and may God be with you.

Anonymous said...

Khomeini and his gang (that's what they really are) do not worship Allah or anything to do with Allah. They worship their power. Just like those who greed for money, those who get a taste of power will do anything to keep it. There is not a shred of love or Allah anything in beating your own people like dogs in the street. Now we all know why these thugs should never be allowed to have nukes.

masoud said...

Tori, Kamran,

I was hoping weather you could clarify why you seem to have an unshakable faith that the elections have been stolen. The fact is that nearly two weeks since the election, there has been zero evidence offered by any of the other candidates. Doesn't Mousavi's absolute refusal to humor a recount, the position he's taken since day one, raise any eyebrows at all?

Tori said...

Masoud, There is plenty of evidence for anyone who is paying attention, and I am certain that you know that.

masoud said...

Tori,
I have been paying a great deal of attention, but really I don't think the case for fraud has any basis at all. Mousavi's written complaint certainly did not contain any ground breaking material. I would say that if anything, what i've read has lead me to believe that the vote was generally free and fair.

What stuns me is that a lot of expat intellectuals and organizations, even those that have been reasonable in the past, either take lines very similar to those on this blog, like Trita Parsi, or try to disregard the question altogether like Hamid Dabashi. Practically the only voice of reason i've heard is Kaveh Afrasiabi
http://mrzine.monthlyreview.org/afrasiabi190609.html

It worries me that such a large swathe of Iraninans seem to be giving themselves over to conspiracy theories.

Masoud

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